Out of My Life and Thought (Schweitzer Library) #2020

[Out of My Life and Thought (Schweitzer Library)] >> Albert Schweitzer Antje Bultmann Lemke Jimmy Carter Out of My Life and Thought shatters the old myth and allows us to glimpse the real Albert Schweitzer, a man whose moral example is as relevant and compelling in the 1990s as it was in the 1930s on first publication Eloquent and heartfelt Los Angeles Times Of the many highly esteemed books Albert Schweitzer penned in his life, he valued his autobiography the most Out of My Life and Thought shatters the old myth and allows us to glimpse the real Albert Schweitzer, a man whose moral example is as relevant and compelling in the 1990s as it was in the 1930s on first publication Eloquent and heartfelt Los Angeles Times Of the many highly esteemed books Albert Schweitzer penned in his life, he valued his autobiography the most He had become a legend and he wanted to remind readers that he was just a man, and a man who had learned from many others He had been fortunate to be in the right places at the right times, to meet people of thought and sympathy He wanted to report his debts to them He wanted to clarify his reasons and methods for his undertakings and to respond to some of his critics And, he wished to honor something greater than he was reverence for life Reverence for Life became his life s motto, and it brought him pain as well as joy as he sought to respect how precious and unique each life is Schweitzer believed there was a way to live in the world, accept it, take joy from it and who could know this better than a man who had placed himself so much in it, given so much for it, and had been ready to receive experience as a gift to be thankful for.In addition to a preface by Rhena Schweitzer Miller and Antje Bultmann Lemke, this translation incorporates revisions and additions Schweitzer made for the French translation of 1960 and those he made for thirty years in his own copy of the original German edition This fascinating volume is the autobiography of the world famous missionary doctor, organist, philosopher, theologian, and Nobel Peace Prize winner, newly translated, researched, and corrected on the basis of recently discovered material Booklist An authentic twentieth century classic Few books in our time have had a greater impact on the life and values of untold numbers of people Norman Cousins
Out of My Life and Thought Schweitzer Library Out of My Life and Thought shatters the old myth and allows us to glimpse the real Albert Schweitzer a man whose moral example is as relevant and compelling in the s as it was in the s on fir

  • Title: Out of My Life and Thought (Schweitzer Library)
  • Author: Albert Schweitzer Antje Bultmann Lemke Jimmy Carter
  • ISBN: 9780801860973
  • Page: 308
  • Format: Paperback
  • Out of My Life and Thought (Schweitzer Library) Author: Albert Schweitzer Antje Bultmann Lemke Jimmy Carter

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      308 Albert Schweitzer Antje Bultmann Lemke Jimmy Carter
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      Posted by:Albert Schweitzer Antje Bultmann Lemke Jimmy Carter
      Published :2019-08-02T03:09:58+00:00

    About the Author

    Albert Schweitzer Antje Bultmann Lemke Jimmy Carter

    Albert Schweitzer, M.D OM, was an Alsatian theologian, musician, philosopher, and physician He was born in Kaisersberg in Alsace Lorraine, a Germanophone region which the German Empire returned to France after World War I Schweitzer challenged both the secular view of historical Jesus current at his time and the traditional Christian view, depicting a Jesus who expected the imminent end of the world He received the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize in 1953 for his philosophy of reverence for life , expressed in many ways, but most famously in founding and sustaining the Lambar n Hospital in Gabon, west central Africa.

    717 Comment

    • Dana said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      Albert Schweitzer was undoubtedly a genius He was a trained theologian and organist who published scholarly works in a variety of disciplines At the age of 30, he decided to devote his life to the serving humanity He wanted to go to Africa as a doctor, so he resigned his faculty position and enrolled in medical school Over the next 50 years, he spent much of his time in Africa His wife and daughter mostly stayed in Europe The conflict between Schweitzer s devotion to his practice and his family [...]

    • Joseph Gascho said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      One of those depressing books in that when it is done you ask yourself what have I done with my life

    • Ron Henderson said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      As an autobiography, uneven and disjointed I admire his emphasis on social action and reasoned thought as opposed to tradition and external control in religion However, in this my first exposure to his writing, I find him just a touch too arrogant when he describes his philosophy, a little too confident that he has answered all questions It s as if coming up with the phrase Reverence for Life suddenly settles every philosophical question Then, in another moment, he s a self proclaimed expert on [...]

    • Les Wolf said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      An introduction to the life and thought of a great missionary, doctor to the tribes of Equatorial Africa, man of letters and theologian who was also an expert on the music of Bach and played the world s greatest music on the world s greatest church organs From the simple truths he learned from everyday living to the deeper truths he discovered through extensive research, the book is filled with wisdom.

    • Michael David said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      There is one verse in the Bible that speaks of only 144,000 people being saved, and if I recall correctly, it s found in Revelation Before I had competent and patient theology professors who elucidated upon that 144,000, I became an atheist temporarily After all, I was an asshole, and there was no argument in that I definitely wouldn t be saved if only 144,000 people would be, especially over the course of history It was my mistake that I took religious literature to be literal in nature, but th [...]

    • Jenna said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      But however concerned I was with the suffering in the world, I never let myself become lost in brooding over it I always held firmly to the thought that each of us can do a little to bring some portion of it to an end Thus I gradually came to the conclusion that all we can understand about the problem is that we must follow our own way as those who want to bring about deliverance A.S.Dr Albert Schweitzer is a hero of mine and this book was on my shelf for many years Though the writing can be den [...]

    • Sam Romilly said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      This is a collection of writings interspaced with events from his life than an autobiography Despite it being quite heavy in places especially around church organs, and the theological discussions of Christianity, I found it an interesting but slow read Whilst he believed himself devoutly religious it seemed to me that the he analysed the fundamental contradictions of the bible and the different interpretations the the absurdity of the enterprise of religion is revealed Ironically the mission [...]

    • Mary said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      I still have the Epilogue to finish but my husband is taking his Kindle with him home tomorrow A quick look at the Epilogue makes me think that will be just fine I tired of Schweitzer s long summaries of the books he was writing, particularly The Philosophy of Civilization I wonder how anyone could think that he could write such a book and so confidently state that Reverence for Life was the answer to his quest for meaning Sentences like Instead the nineteenth century lost itself in the nonessen [...]

    • Liedzeit said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      Mit sehr viel Ernst berichtet er von seinen theologischen Studien Dann die Entscheidung, als Arzt nach Afrika zu gehen Dazu in relativ hohem Alter noch Medizin studiert Ein eitler Mann Es geht fast nur um seine intellektuellen Leistungen und sein Orgelspiel Auch dar ber, und ber Bach, hat er sich ausgelassen Das Private kommt grotesk kurz Gattin wird einmal in einem Nebensatz eingef hrt Nat rlich muss man Respekt haben, aber er kommt nicht eben sympathisch r ber.

    • Josiah said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      Two quotes I leave you with On why he went to Lamberene It is unthinkable that we civilized peoples should keep for ourselves alone those means for fighting sickness, pain, and death that science has given us If there is any ethical thinking at all among us, how can we refuse to let these new discoveries benefit those in distant lands who are subject to even greater physical distress than we are In addition to the physicians who are sent out by the governments, and of whom there are never enough [...]

    • P.J. Sullivan said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      A philosopher and mystic argues for rational thought and what he called reverence for life I am in complete disagreement with the spirit of our age, because it is filled with contempt for thought The primary issue of philosophy was to achieve an active ethic, a realistic confrontation with reality His active ethic was to serve the poor and the sick in West Africa Rational thought boils over into mystical thought Mysticism is knowledge of the infinite Mysticism is not the flower on the plant of t [...]

    • Val said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      Love, love, love Albert and all his wonderful accomplishments, however, this particular book didn t make the grade for me His command of English prose cannot be denied, but I was hoping for highlights and insights rather than tedious description of reminiscence and recollections, whole paragraphs of which a good editor would have tossed out today For example, pages of painstaking description of his Hebrew studies finally got to the point which was why he persevered in these studies and its effec [...]

    • Emily said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      A remarkable man shares his amazing life in an astonishingly humble way A theologian, professor, lecturer, author, authority on comparative religion, philosopher, professional musician, humanitarian, physician, and much I am surely forgetting, spends most of his adult life providing medical care in the depths of Africa The reason for only three stars has nothing to do with the story of his life, but in many places the story didn t move along, and I wanted of his thoughts on philosophy and theo [...]

    • Sean Howard said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      This book was part of an exercise a friend gave me He had me take my Myers Briggs and then to search for famous people with the same final profile.What grew on me as I read this book was a realization that the traits I most downplay in myself were actually Albert s greatest strengths He even spoke openly of them Which made me realize they are my greatest strengths as well.And I fell in love with his yearning to not only be in service but to redefine civilization to unite ethics with a real view [...]

    • Keith Madsen said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      A great autobiography of a great man He had the audacity to take Jesus seriously when he said, Those who seek to save their life shall lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake and the gospel s, shall save it Living life for others we could use like him in our own time The main drawback of the book is that in the early chapters he gets wrapped up in technical theological arguments, which will leave many readers scratching their heads Still this is a classic book which should have a pla [...]

    • Erik Graff said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      Self actualizers, particularly young ones, take note Albert Schweitzer had degrees in musicology, philosophy, theology and medicine, practicing throughout his life as both an organist and as a physician mostly as a medical missionary, his musical performances and many publications supporting his aid work Beyond this he was both a peace and environmental activist Polylingual, he did charitable fundraising and political work throughout much of the world and throughout virtually all of his life, a [...]

    • Craig Robertson said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      Well worth reading Schweitzer is a commanding character of the early 20th century, an humanitarian of the highest class The book reveals may personal insights and glimpses into his soul We read of a pious missionary, a dedicated physician, and a staunch anti war advocate We also glimpse his mania and his religious zeal Much can be learned from an excellent man such as Schweitzer and hearing it in his own voice is a precious gift The book is definitely dated in its style and he does writing volum [...]

    • John said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      I read this book when a freshman at the University of South Florida in 1960 About the only thing I remember is the phrase Reverence for Life This time I realized our much fuller of ideas and experience this book contains Whether one is religious or not Schweitzer impresses me with his thought and the process he goes through in developing his ideas Most impressive are his many accomplishments during these early years, ranging from his religious, philosophical, music to his medical studies.

    • Emma said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      I would have enjoyed this book if it had been of the sort of autobiography that chronicled his life experiences Instead, a good portion of it read as a condensed version of his previously published works While interesting, it was not quite what I was expecting and made for some dense reading.

    • Melissa said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      This book made a profound impact on my life when I encountered it as a teenager Schweitzer s philosophy of reverence for life struck a chord that inspired me even though it has been a difficult standard to try to live by.

    • Michael said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      A memoir by a great thinker and a great humanitarian Not always interesting but when it is, it ascends to heights of astonishing clarity rarely attained by even the greatest classics A rewarding read.

    • Nancy said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      I really enjoyed this book.It wasn t an easy read because of his philosophical theological ideas It was hard to totally understand what he was saying But he was an amazing man and it was worth the effort.

    • Jeremy said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      Wow Truly an amazing man, but I used this book to help me fall asleep at night Just a page, page and a half would do it I d sleep like a baby.

    • Carl Hesler said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      Inspiring, then sad.

    • Callie said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      Is this even worth finishing

    • Valerie said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      recommendedI can t wait to reread this after recently reading Things Fall Apart

    • ara133photography said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      This is a really wonderful book so inspiring This book is the reason I ve been a vegetarian for 18 years

    • Sarah said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      See, I put this book in a lot of categories because if there ever was a renaissance man, Albert Schweitzer fits the bill Brilliant.

    • Spencer said:
      Feb 17, 2020 - 03:09 AM

      Certainly an interesting guy with lots of fingers in different pies Probably better as a philanthropist than a philosopher He certainly seems to know his way around an organ.

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